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Our recent Office of Finance benchmark research demonstrates the importance of using automation to execute finance department functions. Information technology systems do at least two things very well that make better use of people’s time, and both of them can substantially improve organizational performance. First, they eliminate the need for people to do repetitive tasks, which frees them to spend time on more valuable work that requires judgment and skill. IT systems also can be programmed to focus only on relevant information while eliminating the need to get immersed in detail. The latter capability supports a “management by exception” approach, which enables executives and managers to better allocate how and where they spend their time.

Our research shows that in finance operations many companiesvr_Office_of_Finance_11_automation_speeds_the_financial_close don’t take advantage of these capabilities. Only half of participating organizations have automated a significant percentage of their finance processes. In particular, just 11 percent have nearly or fully automated their financial close, while almost half (48%) apply some automation and 36 percent little or none. It also reveals automation’s positive impact on performance: 71 percent of companies that nearly or fully automate their close process are able to close their quarterly books in six or fewer business days whereas 43 percent those that have only partially automated are able to do so and just 23 percent that use little or no automation have this ability. Another example is the automation of reconciliation, which is an essential element of the close process. It’s a repetitive task that lends itself to automation, and affordable software for managing the task is mature. Yet just 37 percent of companies have applied automation to their reconciliation process. Automation of reconciliation also correlates with how quickly a company closes its books: 57 percent of companies that use software for this purpose close their quarters within six business days and 30 percent do it in four business days. By contrast, 73 percent of the companies that do not automate reconciliation take seven or more working days to close.

Spreadsheets are a valuable tool for many finance department tasks, but they are out of place when used for repetitive, collaborative enterprise-wide processes. Indeed, they are both a symptom and a cause of dysfunctional processes, systems and data. A symptom because they frequently become the default option to put a bandage over, for example, vr_Office_of_Finance_04_spreadsheets_are_the_tool_of_choiceissues that arise because systems are not properly integrated or a process is not supported by the appropriate technology such as a dedicated application. But spreadsheets remain the tool of choice for a variety of finance department tasks. Almost all midsize and larger companies (those with 100 or more employees) use them for management accounting analysis and nine out of 10 use them to manage their long-range and strategic planning process and to do financial analysis. More than eight in 10 use spreadsheets for direct and indirect tax provisioning as well as treasury management. Spreadsheets have their place, but our research demonstrates that they are frequently misused.

The close is a useful process to benchmark because almost every company does it and there’s a measurable outcome: the number of days after the period’s end in which the company completes the process. To be sure, this metric does not represent the full amount of time companies spend on executing the close. Corporations that close their books the day after the period ends usually have already started parts of the process before the end of the period, and some of these processes are performed weekly or even daily in order to balance workloads over the month. Yet to focus on the total hours spent is to miss the point: Managing to a faster close is not just about efficiency, it’s also about getting the numbers to executives and managers so they can react quickly to issues and opportunities. The research demonstrates a close correlation between when the close is completed and the timeliness of communicating that information to the rest of the company.

Time is the critical ingredient that determines the overallvr_Office_of_Finance_09_fast_closers_have_more_timely_information performance of finance and accounting departments. Poorly performing organizations usually are mired in an endless cycle of fighting fires – for example, dealing with the impact of processes that are poorly designed or not properly executed. These departments are constantly contending with the impact of information sources that are unreliable, difficult to access or both. Poorly designed systems add to the problem, generating hours of work in the form of manual reconciliations done in spreadsheets. Think of a finance department that does not apply automation and that has poorly designed or executed processes and systems as a caged hamster running on a wheel. It expends a great deal of effort on repetitive manual processes that are only marginally productive.

Software automation by itself will not address all of the challenges of a finance and accounting organization. To optimize performance companies almost always must deal with an interrelated combination of people, process, technology and data issues in a holistic fashion. Yet confronted with the day-to-day struggle of meeting deadlines, many finance executives put off addressing their productivity and effectiveness issues. They shouldn’t, because a continuous improvement process involving a steady set of small advances can yield impressive results over time. Identifying the biggest time sinks that can be readily eliminated and then eliminating them can free up the resources needed to address the next set of significant problems. Even something as straightforward as uncovering unnecessary work or replacing the worst spreadsheets with better technology (for instance, implementing automated or self-service reporting) will be beneficial. For this to happen, though, senior finance and accounting executives must make automation a priority.

Regards,

Robert Kugel – SVP Research


It is more important than ever for businesses to attract and retain the best talent, and managing compensation effectively is an essential tool for doing so. Obviously companies must pay well to compete, but managing salary, merit pay, variable pay and incentives for employees, tracking their hiring anniversaries and conducting accurate performance appraisals make total compensation management a complex process. All of this must be managed within budget and policy guidelines. As organizations grow and require more employees, the challenges multiply and the difficulty increases. Our benchmark research finds that inconsistent execution is the top impediment to effective compensation management for nearly half (47%) of organizations. Software designed for this purpose can help.

Beqom, which has offered compensation management software since 2009 and previously was known as Excentive International, has advanced its applications to meet these challenges for all business units and especially Human Resources, which typically manages this process. It supports a range of compensation types from salary, merit and bonus pay to long-term incentives and stock options.

Beqom is rated a Hot Vendor in our 2014 Value Index for Total Compensation Management. Ventana_Research_TCM_VI_HotVendor_2014Each Value Index methodically assesses vendors across seven evaluation categories covering the products and the vendors. Beqom ranks high in several evaluation areas; in particular it tops the list in Capability and ranks second in Manageability. The software’s flexibility in modeling can address all aspects of compensation, including sales compensation, in one application. For example, its ability to handle the variety of crediting from accounts and territories is effective for sales operations teams. In addition its ability to make compensation visually engaging in management of employees and hierarchies and tracking of budgets is simple and engaging. Its ability to define and apply rules and calculation helps support a range of compensation and incentive plans. Its compensation dashboard and reporting simplify oversight and management of compensation. The application has been designed to enable HR and operations professionals to administer and manage compensation processes with minimal IT involvement, which is one reason why it rated so high in Manageability. While beqom does not provide much public information on its advancements from one release to another, and I believe it should do more, it does bring out iterative improvements quarterly through feature packs and makes major new releases annually.

Since the publication of our Value Index, beqom has taken steps to demonstrate its total cost of ownership (TCO), which we found lacking. One unique aspect in which it has invested is to take the complexity of implementation and maintenance costs out of customers’ migration to its software. The company charges a single annual fee to migrate, implement and deploy. Most organizations do not assess costs beyond the use of the software and are surprised by extra fees for migration and implementation. Even in cloud computing there is no magic to migrate a company to a new application environment. Unlike many vendors beqom addresses these issues in procuring software by building in the services needed.

It also is different from others in the market that have integrated compensation management with their talent management suites. While there is value in a unified approach, many organizations don’t want to replace other talent management applications (such as recruiting and performance management) to acquire compensation management through a suite, and beqom’s stand-alone package suits this preference. Even so beqom has integrated its software with talent management applications in customer deployments and can help share compensation information with them.

Our compensation management research finds opportunity vr_tcm_compensation_management_goalsfor vendors in replacing spreadsheets used for this purpose, which remain prevalent. A large majority (71%) of organizations have found some type of errors in payment that had to be fixed before payment or had to be corrected after the fact. Such problems create challenges in financial accuracy, employee trust and the ability to govern compensation. This is a factor in more finance organizations getting involved to help improve compensation processes; our research finds that in almost one-third of organizations Finance is stepping up to influence improvements. Almost one-fourth of finance departments want direct access to this information for financial planning and analysis. Software such as beqom’s can help organizations replace spreadsheets and more importantly reach the primary goals of compensation management: improvement of efficiency, alignment and performance, which are important to about nine out of 10 participants in our research. Closing the gaps in compensation policies and practices is critical, and managing it effectively and transparently can build confidence and trust among employees.

Seeing is believing with beqom. If you are assessing your current approach and considering changes to simplify compensation management, it is worthwhile to view a demonstration of what it can do.

Regards,

Mark Smith

CEO and Chief Research Officer

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